Have You Planned Your Internal Launch As Part Of Your Go-To-Market Strategy?

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Have You Planned Your Internal Launch As Part Of Your Go-To-Market Strategy?

A clear go-to-market strategy is needed when launching a new service or bringing existing services into a new market. However, an area that is often overlooked is ensuring you effectively communicate changes & updates to your internal teams. 

Your employees can be your best marketing channel

The main go-to-market plans are focused on the external – what customers are you targeting? What are the key messages? How are you going to distribute this messaging to your potential and existing customers to get your service to market?

A key way in which you can distribute messaging and deliver on your go-to-market plans is via your own team, whether that be your core delivery team or back-offices support. They will all have either an interaction with your end customer or a potential network of potential customers. Part of your go-to-market plan should consider how you can develop your team into brand advocates. 

Creating internal brand advocacy for your new service or brand will not be done by simply informing teams about any changes. They need to be properly engaged on the full story. 

  • What is changing?
  • Why?
  • Why is it great for end customers?
  • When?

Clearly plan out how you will deliver the answers to these questions. Plan what you need in order to support these messages and what they will need to help drive this out to market.

Your full team is needed to deliver your services

As well as turning your internal team into great brand advocates, creating a comprehensive internal launch plan will support better end user service delivery. 

By effectively communicating all changes and updates to your team, you will not only inform them so that the correct information is distributed and new process followed, but you will help to reduce barriers to change.

If your sales team does not see the value in a new service, they will resist driving these new sales and continue to push those that convert well traditionally. If your delivery team have not been consulted, they will be slower to adopt new processes and that will impact customer experience. 

Your team can test your go-to-market strategy  

Test and optimize. From software development to advertising we embrace this mindset. The same needs to be brought to your go-to-market launch to ensure it is effective, and your internal team are the perfect starting point.

Although adding to your service catalogue will likely involve multiple departments, there will be learnings to be gained from those not involved.  The reason why this change is good may be clear at the board level and for those close to the new service, but if you are not able to convey this to your wider team you may miss the mark with new customers.

Roll out any new messaging internally with an extended group and absorb their feedback – allow them to criticise, as the biggest learnings may come from this criticism. Make sure you take this feedback onboard before a wider internal launch.

You should go out to the market only once you have launched internally.

Where to start when building your internal launch plan

  1. Identify the key stakeholders that will be involved from the beginning and consult with them. They should include members from all levels within the company. They can act as brand leads and core points of contact for the wider team. These members can also be your first messaging test group.
  2. Plan to engage with staff before, during and after the launch to ensure everything is clear and queries are dealt with in advance. 
  3. Set time aside for training on the new service and explaining customer engagement.
  4. Create systems and structures to help reduce uncertainty. You can create supporting tools such as guides and checklists to be used post-training. 
  5. Have space and time to purposefully launch to your internal team. Make this internal launch as engaging as possible and take everyone through the vision as well as the practicalities of this change. Allow questions. Your intention is not to simply inform but inspire. Your team should leave this session excited and ready for the future. 

Having a go-to-market plan is a good business practice, but having an internal launch supports your wider business transformation, as you will work in a united team with one vision.

Subtitle

The massive uncertainty around COVID-19 has fixed some companies—and managers—in place, making them unable to react quickly to the changes affecting their business. But for others, it’s been a catalyst for change and an opportunity to gain new insights about their customers’ needs and to demonstrate their agility to adapt and grow.

One leader who has adopted the latter approach is Keith Choy, the head of the Asia–Pacific unit of GlaxoSmithKline’s (GSK) Consumer Healthcare group. Choy is encouraging his team of 6,000 people to consider the pandemic a call to action, a chance to double down on existing digitalization initiatives and strengthen end-to-end supply chains to even better respond to emerging consumption trends across the 23 Asia–Pacific markets the company serves. All while speeding up the cadence of the company.

In October, Choy spoke with McKinsey’s Kenneth Bonheure and David Schwartz to describe how GSK is responding to COVID-19, how the company is guided by its values, and what global companies can do to succeed in Asia during COVID-19 and beyond.

The Quarterly: Describe the business environment right now. What are you seeing? What are you focusing on?

In October, Choy spoke with McKinsey’s Kenneth Bonheure and David Schwartz to describe how GSK is responding to COVID-19, how the company is guided by its values, and what global companies can do to succeed in Asia during COVID-19 and beyond.

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